The Colt Gold Cup is Still a Striking Pistol After All These Years

The Colt Gold Cup is Still a Striking Pistol After All These Years

The Gold Cup Match Pistol’s history begins in the Office of the Director of Civilian Marksmanship. Created in 1903 as part of the War Department Appropriations Act, the measure was designed to improve military marksmanship while also granting civilians the opportunity to learn and practice their marksmanship skills in the event they were called to serve in the U.S. military. President Theodore Roosevelt, Secretary of War Elihu Root, NRA President General Byrd Spencer were among the supporters of the act.

The National Dogs of War Trophy, which continues as one of the most prestigious team trophies in U.S. marksmanship, was the first award. When National Trophy Matches expanded to include pistol events, the first pistol trophy awarded was the General Custer Trophy. It typically goes to the national trophy individual pistol champion. The national matches began in Caldwell, New Jersey but migrated to Camp Perry in Ohio in 1907.

At the 1932 National Matches, Colt debuted its first national match model for competition. By 1933, the company offering a National Match Pistol for consumers to buy straight out of the factory. These Colt models differed from standard options as they incorporated a match-grade barrel, checked trigger, checked mainspring housing, walnut stocks and internal parts that were hand-honed.

Colt discontinued production in 1941, due to World War II, and it wasn’t until 1957 that the firearms maker introduced a revamped version of its competition classic by way of the Gold Cup.